Mandrake 9.1 NVIDIA driver install How to Step by Step


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Thread: Mandrake 9.1 NVIDIA driver install How to Step by Step

  1. #1
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    Post Mandrake 9.1 NVIDIA driver install How to Step by Step

    Mandrake 9.1 NVIDIA driver install

    This is written for newbies like myself that need details. Read the entire thing before starting this. I tried to make it as simple as possible. If you have a good downloaded file and follow this your problems should be minimal.

    I'm going to assume that you can navigate using Konqueror and use a editer such as Kwrite. You should also get the basics of a command line editer called "vi" just in case the driver does not work and you need to change the driver back to the old basic one. If you have a linux book check for editers that work in commandline. That will get you back into 'x' at least.
    It is not really that bad to install but you have to do it in command line not through the GUI or 'x'. If you are a newbie like myself it can be scary. Especially if it doesn't work the first time. BTW, booting to 'failsafe' will not work. 'x' will crash and you will be disappointed.

    The first thing is to download the driver and put it in the /root directory. You can get the latest driver here: http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux.html. You will most likely want the IA32 version, that's Intel/AMD 32 bit. Once you get that downloaded and in the proper directory, you are ready to get it installed. It's important to put it in the right directory or know exactly where it is.

    You will need to edit the inittab file and the XF86Config-4 file. You will need to edit the inittab so that you will boot into the command line not into the GUI or 'x'. The inittab file is in the following location for Konqueror, file:/etc/inittab . You should have root access. The line you are looking for is "id:5:initdefault:". You will need to change the '5' to a '3'. It should look like this "id:3:initdefault:. "This will get you to a text login. It will be sort of like old DOS, no pretty screens or anything. Remember this file, you will need to change it back when you are done. Of course some leave it like this but that's up to you.

    Make a note of what you change here or print a copy if you can of the original file. Now to edit the XF86Config-4 file. It should be located here, file:/etc/X11/XF86Config-4. You will need to look for and change this part 'Section "Device"'. It's about half way down the file. You will need to change 'Driver "nv"' to 'Driver "nvidia"'. This will load the drivers when 'x' starts.
    Now look for the part 'Section "Module"'. It's pretty close to the top. Look for a line that says 'Load "dri"' and 'Load "GLcore"'. If you have these lines put a '#' in front of them. The system will then ignore those commands. I don't like deleting, if you have to switch back this will make it easier. Now, in the same section look for a command 'Load "glx"'. It should already be there but make sure it is. It needs to be there. Don't delete it. You have now got your XF86Config-4 file ready. Click 'save'.

    Now comes the part that is a bit new for newbies that have not used other distro's and are not used to the command line and login. It's time to reboot. When you reboot you will not get windows or a GUI. You will get a login prompt. When you get the prompt type in 'root' and hit enter. Type in your password. You are ready to install your driver. If you put the file in the right directory this should be very easy. Type in 'ls'. The NVIDIA driver should be right there in the list. If it's not there try typing in 'cd ..' and hit enter. Then type in 'cd /home/<user name>/Desktop'. Replace <user name> with your user name, mine would look like this for example '/home/dale/Desktop'.
    Do a 'ls' and see if it is there. If it is not try this 'cd ..' and then type in 'cd Documents', do a 'ls' and see if it is there. If by now you have found the file, you are ready to go.
    This part is easy. Type in 'sh ' and the name of the file exactly like it is on the screen. It is case sensitive and put a space between sh and the file name. You should get a screen that says loading, then accept the agreement etc. Use the arrow keys to change your selection. No mouse here, sorry. Just let it walk you through. When it gets done with the install, you will be back at the prompt. If you get a error write it down and skip to the shutdown part or edit the XF86Config-4 file back to the way it was and type 'startx'. If you get no errors, type in 'exit'. You will be back at the login and will take you out of root.
    Login in as a regular user, mine for example would be 'dale' then type in your password. When you get the prompt, type in 'startx' and hit enter. 'x' should start. If it works you will see a white screen with a graphic and 'NVIDIA' in the middle. If you have this, the install was sucessful. If you don't get this something went wrong. You will get a error message when 'x' shuts down. The important part will start with (EE). Write this info down and see if you can find a post that will help you diagnose the problem. If you can't find the error and need help, post with the subject "Mandrake 9.1 NVIDIA" and some of the error message. Put the entire error in the post. Someone will have run into and fixed or will know what the error means and how to fix.

    If you have a error, you will need to change the XF86Config-4 file back like it was. You can do a 'cd ..' until you get to root, '/', then type in 'cd etc', then 'vi XF86Config-4'. This will let you edit the file back to the way it was. The really important part is to change 'nvidia' to 'nv' like it was. Hope you have the 'vi' info handy. It's a bit tricky for a newbie but I survived with out much damage. Just change the file back and save and exit the editor. When you get back to the prompt, type in 'startx' and it should get you back into the GUI with the old set of drivers. If you had rather just reboot into windows to get help you can type in 'shutdown -r now'. This will reboot your system and you will have the option to get windows as usual when it restarts.

    If all worked well and you want to change so that 'x' starts automatically, you will need to change the file 'inittab' back to '5' like it was before this install. You can leave it this way if you want. Some people do this anyway. To get into 'x' if you want to do it this way, just type in your login and password then 'startx'. When you exit, logout, of 'x' it will take you back to the prompt, just type in exit and you will get a login. Login as root, and type in 'shutdown -r now' to reboot or 'shutdown -h now' to turn off your system. If you change the 'inittab' file back to '5' it will boot like it used to.

    Hopefully you will have had success. If so, I hope this how to helped. I tried to make it for a newbie. There are other ways to do it but this way, if there are no problems, most is done in a GUI. This is much easier for a newbie.

    Disclaimer: This is for a guide only. I assume no responsibility for problems. This is how I did it and it worked. Your system may be different and require different steps. Use at your own risk.
    Last edited by dalek; 08-07-2003 at 05:54 PM.
    My rig: Gigabyte GA-770T-USB3 mobo || AMD Phenom II X4 955 3.2GHz || ZALMAN CNPS10X Performa CPU cooler
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  2. #2
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    Whew! Thanks

    Thanks for the comprehensive explination. I was having a hard time trying to figure out how to dis-engage X windows.
    -cinnabar

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  4. #4
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    Question Great

    Did it help that much? Was it easy to follow? Did it work? How new are you to Linux?

    Just curious.

    My rig: Gigabyte GA-770T-USB3 mobo || AMD Phenom II X4 955 3.2GHz || ZALMAN CNPS10X Performa CPU cooler
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    HP Deskjet D4260 printer || LG GH22NS50B DVD R/W || WD1600AAJS & WD2502ABYS & Samsung HD753LJ hard drives
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  5. #5
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    Its a really good effort, but as a word of advice not insult in any way, those paragraphs are FAR too long, it puts me off reading it, re-edit it and it will be great.
    Our diversity is our strength.

  6. #6
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    Thumbs up No hard feelings here.

    I asked because I wanted to know. I did a little editing. What do you think? I'm not a writer by any means, just a disabled guy who has time on his hands and wants to make it easier on people who don't have the time. I would like to see Linux take over windoze. I'm working on the UPS now.

    My rig: Gigabyte GA-770T-USB3 mobo || AMD Phenom II X4 955 3.2GHz || ZALMAN CNPS10X Performa CPU cooler
    G.SKILL 16GB DDR3 PC3 12800 Memory || Nvidia GT-220 video card || LG W2253 Monitor
    HP Deskjet D4260 printer || LG GH22NS50B DVD R/W || WD1600AAJS & WD2502ABYS & Samsung HD753LJ hard drives
    Cyberpower 1250AVR UPS || Cooler Master HAF-932 Case

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    WARNING: Slow typer. Someone may answer the question while I'm trying to type it in. Oh, I type bad too.

  7. #7
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    Re: Mandrake 9.1 NVIDIA driver install How to Step by Step

    Originally posted by dalek
    Mandrake 9.1 NVIDIA driver install

    This is written for newbies like myself that need details. Read the entire thing before starting this. I tried to make it as simple as possible. If you have a good downloaded file and follow this your problems should be minimal.

    I'm going to assume that you can navigate using Konqueror and use a editer such as Kwrite. You should also get the basics of a command line editer called "vi" just in case the driver does not work and you need to change the driver back to the old basic one. If you have a linux book check for editers that work in commandline. That will get you back into 'x' at least.

    It is not really that bad to install but you have to do it in command line not through the GUI or 'x'. If you are a newbie like myself it can be scary. Especially if it doesn't work the first time. BTW, booting to 'failsafe' will not work. 'x' will crash and you will be disappointed.

    The first thing is to download the driver and put it in the /root directory. You can get the latest driver here: http://www.nvidia.com/object/linux.html. You will most likely want the IA32 version, that's Intel/AMD 32 bit. Once you get that downloaded and in the proper directory, you are ready to get it installed. It's important to put it in the right directory or know exactly where it is.

    You will need to edit the inittab file and the XF86Config-4 file. You will need to edit the inittab so that you will boot into the command line not into the GUI or 'x'. The inittab file is in the following location for Konqueror, file:/etc/inittab . You should have root access. The line you are looking for is "id:5:initdefault:". You will need to change the '5' to a '3'. It should look like this "id:3:initdefault:. "This will get you to a text login. It will be sort of like old DOS, no pretty screens or anything. Remember this file, you will need to change it back when you are done. Of course some leave it like this but that's up to you.

    Make a note of what you change here or print a copy if you can of the original file. Now to edit the XF86Config-4 file. It should be located here, file:/etc/X11/XF86Config-4. You will need to look for and change this part 'Section "Device"'. It's about half way down the file. You will need to change 'Driver "nv"' to 'Driver "nvidia"'. This will load the drivers when 'x' starts.

    Now look for the part 'Section "Module"'. It's pretty close to the top. Look for a line that says 'Load "dri"' and 'Load "GLcore"'. If you have these lines put a '#' in front of them. The system will then ignore those commands. I don't like deleting, if you have to switch back this will make it easier. Now, in the same section look for a command 'Load "glx"'. It should already be there but make sure it is. It needs to be there. Don't delete it. You have now got your XF86Config-4 file ready. Click 'save'.

    Now comes the part that is a bit new for newbies that have not used other distro's and are not used to the command line and login. It's time to reboot. When you reboot you will not get windows or a GUI. You will get a login prompt. When you get the prompt type in 'root' and hit enter. Type in your password. You are ready to install your driver.

    If you put the file in the right directory this should be very easy. Type in 'ls'. The NVIDIA driver should be right there in the list. If it's not there try typing in 'cd ..' and hit enter. Then type in 'cd /home/<user name>/Desktop'. Replace <user name> with your user name, mine would look like this for example '/home/dale/Desktop'.

    Do a 'ls' and see if it is there. If it is not try this 'cd ..' and then type in 'cd Documents', do a 'ls' and see if it is there. If by now you have found the file, you are ready to go.

    This part is easy. Type in 'sh ' and the name of the file exactly like it is on the screen. It is case sensitive and put a space between sh and the file name. You should get a screen that says loading, then accept the agreement etc. Use the arrow keys to change your selection. No mouse here, sorry. Just let it walk you through. When it gets done with the install, you will be back at the prompt. If you get a error write it down and skip to the shutdown part or edit the XF86Config-4 file back to the way it was and type 'startx'. If you get no errors, type in 'exit'. You will be back at the login and will take you out of root.

    Login in as a regular user, mine for example would be 'dale' then type in your password. When you get the prompt, type in 'startx' and hit enter. 'x' should start. If it works you will see a white screen with a graphic and 'NVIDIA' in the middle. If you have this, the install was sucessful. If you don't get this something went wrong. You will get a error message when 'x' shuts down. The important part will start with (EE). Write this info down and see if you can find a post that will help you diagnose the problem. If you can't find the error and need help, post with the subject "Mandrake 9.1 NVIDIA" and some of the error message. Put the entire error in the post. Someone will have run into and fixed or will know what the error means and how to fix.

    If you have a error, you will need to change the XF86Config-4 file back like it was. You can do a 'cd ..' until you get to root, '/', then type in 'cd etc', then 'vi XF86Config-4'. This will let you edit the file back to the way it was. The really important part is to change 'nvidia' to 'nv' like it was. Hope you have the 'vi' info handy. It's a bit tricky for a newbie but I survived with out much damage. Just change the file back and save and exit the editor.

    When you get back to the prompt, type in 'startx' and it should get you back into the GUI with the old set of drivers. If you had rather just reboot into windows to get help you can type in 'shutdown -r now'. This will reboot your system and you will have the option to get windows as usual when it restarts.

    If all worked well and you want to change so that 'x' starts automatically, you will need to change the file 'inittab' back to '5' like it was before this install. You can leave it this way if you want. Some people do this anyway. To get into 'x' if you want to do it this way, just type in your login and password then 'startx'. When you exit, logout, of 'x' it will take you back to the prompt, just type in exit and you will get a login. Login as root, and type in 'shutdown -r now' to reboot or 'shutdown -h now' to turn off your system. If you change the 'inittab' file back to '5' it will boot like it used to.

    Hopefully you will have had success. If so, I hope this how to helped. I tried to make it for a newbie. There are other ways to do it but this way, if there are no problems, most is done in a GUI. This is much easier for a newbie.

    Disclaimer: This is for a guide only. I assume no responsibility for problems. This is how I did it and it worked. Your system may be different and require different steps. Use at your own risk.
    maybe like that

    You can do a 'cd ..' until you get to root, '/', I'd change that to 'cd /etc'

    Excellent all the same
    Last edited by bascule; 08-07-2003 at 06:29 PM.
    Our diversity is our strength.

  8. #8
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    dalek,
    I found your instructions very helpful but not particularly terse. Maybe a list of steps would help. I have only been using Linux on a desktop for about a month but I have modeling programs in bash for a long time so I am very comfortable with vi and many of the bash commands. Someone less familiar with vi might have a more difficult time. Anyway, thanks for taking the time to write that it; it was helpful and the driver appears to be working fine.

  9. #9
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    dalek,
    your instructions ..
    nice
    simple
    to the point
    and they work

    ta very much

  10. #10
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    Talking Great News

    malsurk, I'm glad they were helpful. The only problem is if the drivers don't work. That is interesting then. If it works however it is as easy as it can get. Most of the hard stuff is in the GUI and is a lot easier.
    Thanks for the reply. I hope that it will helpa lot of people new to Linux or not.

    My rig: Gigabyte GA-770T-USB3 mobo || AMD Phenom II X4 955 3.2GHz || ZALMAN CNPS10X Performa CPU cooler
    G.SKILL 16GB DDR3 PC3 12800 Memory || Nvidia GT-220 video card || LG W2253 Monitor
    HP Deskjet D4260 printer || LG GH22NS50B DVD R/W || WD1600AAJS & WD2502ABYS & Samsung HD753LJ hard drives
    Cyberpower 1250AVR UPS || Cooler Master HAF-932 Case

    Myspace
    WARNING: Slow typer. Someone may answer the question while I'm trying to type it in. Oh, I type bad too.

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