A simple suggestion for the overwhelmed newbie - Page 4


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Thread: A simple suggestion for the overwhelmed newbie

  1. #46
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    Mar 2004
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    Thunder Bay Canada
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    Even I switched back to KDE, Gnome is a mess now. KDE sure has come a long way!
    Linux user #367409

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by infiniphunk View Post
    Even I switched back to KDE, Gnome is a mess now. KDE sure has come a long way!
    I will agree. the last release getting the adjustment of default screen resolution thing figured out makes it an attractive desktop if you have the equipment.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    New Orleans, LA USA
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    While I don't like Gnome3 on a desktop (I've grown to like it on a netbook), I don't think I've ever liked KDE. Granted I don't think I've even loaded it since KDE3 first came out. I started in Black Box because I had a crap computer, then Gnome2 after upgrades, then Gnome as DM with Enlightenment as WM hybrid, then full blown Enlightenment. I run Gnome3 on the netbook.

    I'm sure I can configure any DM to act like Enlightenment, but it behaves how I want out-of-box and I just have to configure eyecandy. Mainly, the way it handles focus - forms do not come to front unless you click the title bar(or in my case alt+click since I remove borders), mouse move changes focus (I can flick the mouse instead of fully grip it), can get rid of borders completely (love fully transparent shells that appear like text on top of the desktop image), virtual desktop thumbnails update and increase in size on mouse over - can pull programs out of thumbnail to current desktop, no start bar (menu is right click desktop or windows key type in app name - tho I usually type the name in a terminal with & so I can see error dumps), etc.

    I've grown used to that behavior and as much as I usually embrace change, the above behavior is something I can't part with - no matter how pretty the eye candy.
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it's time to pause and reflect."

    -Mark Twain

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    8

    blackbelt_jones

    I want to get a live CD for each desktop environment. when I do this Remember that you're testing the desktop environment itself, and not the applications. thanks for shearing this topic.

  5. #50
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    Oct 2002
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    Binghamton NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by infiniphunk View Post
    Even I switched back to KDE, Gnome is a mess now. KDE sure has come a long way!
    Agreed, though I still love KDE3 on my notebook. Up to the most recent stable release of Slackware 13.37, I've still been able to run KDE3.5 from packages in the unsupported repositories. I haven't been able to run them on the Release candidates for Slackware 14, and that's dissapointing, but I still have Slax, and KIARA, my own customized version of Slax. KDE3 is more limited than KDE4, but less perfect, and I love Knewsticker

    http://www.kiaragnulinux.blogspot.com/

    Note::In case anybody wants to download KIARA: I keep the web software for continually upgraded, but the base is Slax 6.1.2, which is getting a little bit long in the tooth. Usually that doesn't matter. Text editing is still text editing, right? But you can't mount a partition formatted with the EXT4 filesystem, at least by the usual means. For that reason, I still keep all of my /home directories on partitions that are formatted with EXT3

    But anyway, for my main Desktop system, KDE4 is pretty good.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    25
    Just recently I have turned two MS Windows users into Penguin Heads. Both of Which had repeatedly said they would never even try Linux. Now they won't go back to Windows. One even still finds it hard to believe that Linux is free.

  7. #52
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    Jul 2013
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    25
    That's odd, I installed Knoppix 7.2 on one of my HD's, during the install it was looking for a FDD(which I do not have on my box). Just wait, it will install, it just takes a while.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    1

    hello

    Quote Originally Posted by blackbelt_jones View Post
    Recently, once again, some poor unfortunate tried to get advice about what distro he should start with, and once again, the contridictory cacophony of partisan voices that responded couldn't have been very helpful.

    So I had a thought. While it's perfectly acceptable to just jump in and install something, and then maybe install something else, those who are what I like to call "li-curious" and wonder if there's a way to make a logical, orderly approach might want to forget about picking a distro for a while and concentrate on picking your favorite desktop environment.

    Besides offering a choice of disributions, Linux offers a choice of desktop environments-- graphical user interfaces. Each of them approaches the question of "point and click" in its own way. The most popular and beginner friendly desktop environments are Gnome and KDE. KDE has the reputation for being the desktop most similar to Microsoft WIndows in terms of look and feel, but there's only so many ways that you can point and click, and if you're used to MS windows, you ought to find gnome reasonably intuitive and easy tp pick up.

    Gnome (my personal favorite) is fairly simple and intuitive for me, makes for a nice, uncluttered desktop, and has a couple of features I really love. (I can open a console window just by right-clicking on the desktop). KDE is flashy, powerful, and feature-rich.

    Get your hands on a couple of live CD's. A live cd is a linux operating system that doesn't need to be installed on your hard drive ; it runs entirely from the CD and from the RAM. This means that a live Linux CD is not only easy to try, you can try it without risking any of your current hard drive data. You can go online , surf, play games, play audio and video files from your hard drive, and a lot more. If you have more than one CD drive, you can burn CDs, using data from your windows hard drive. (a live CD won't write to your hard drive unless you enable it, but most can READ from your hard drive.

    Besides being an easy, no risk way to test-drive Linux, live CDs have a lot of great uses, including repair and rescue-- but that's for another post.

    You want to get a live CD for each desktop environment. Live CDs that use KDE include Knoppix and Kanotix. Live CDs that use Gnome include Gnoppix, and the live version of Ubuntu. Try them both out thoroughly, and see which you prefer.

    Remember that you're testing the desktop environment itself, and not the applications. Certain applications are associated with gnome (they tend to have names that start with "g", like gedit and gthumb, and others are associated with KDE (they tend to have names that start with "k", like kedit and k3b). On live CDs, these associations tend to be rigidly enforced due to space restrictions-- but when you pick a distribution to install to your hard drive, you can almost always mix and match with ease, according to your preferences. If (like me) you prefer gnome but love to use the CD burning utility K3B, you absolutely can have both.

    When you've decided which desktop you prefer, you're already starting to get a handle on what sort of distro you want. You can usually pick either desktop to go with most distibutions, but there are definitely distros that don't go so well with gnome (mepis, kanotix, and slackware need to have it installed. In my limited experience, it crashes a lot with SuSE) . Gnome tends to run good on those distros where it is the default: debian, red hat/fedora, and Ubuntu. (If there are distros that don't go well with KDE, I don't know much about them, ' cause I'm not a KDE guy,)

    These are only the two most popular options. I should mention that there are other, more specialized desktops that can be installed on your system, but beginners shouldn't worry about them just yet. Some are good for older systems because they don't use as many resources. Others are (to my uninformed eyes) just plain weird. And then, of course, there's the Linux Power User-- who don't need no stinkin' desktop!

    Anyway, if you find the choices of distro dizzying, there's a chance that knowing whether you prefer KDE or Gnome will give you enough practical knowledge to make it all seem less intimidating-- and there's also the chance that I have confused you further. If I have, I'm sorry. Just remember, it's all about the fun!

    I'll be back with 24 hours to dress up this post with some nice helpful links and screen shots... oh, and I'll also clean up some of the typos.

    HEY! I think that THIS IS MY 1000th post! Before I was blackbelt_jones, I was posting in here as spiderbaby1958. That was when I was posting in here with a Windows computing. When I got online with my fist superslow Mandrake system, I immediately came here and opened a new account. Therefore, I mark my beginning with Linux from the time I joined this forum as blackbelt_jones, three years ago this month.


    how can i build a motherboard

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    25
    You can't build a mo0therboard, you must buy one from a manufacturer.

  10. #55
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    Nov 2013
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    4
    After 15 years of bouncing around all the Windows and Linux OS's, and dropping windows like "a hot coal", I found that best of the best is Scientific Linux for a simple solid all around good working super-secure OS.. and after UE 3.4 died, Ultimate Edition 3.4.2 for the best and funnest general media OS.. and DBAN the best tool to prep an OS for future install.. But as far as changing desktop handlers, I still can't get it right.. Seems I make too many changes, that eventually kills the OS, knocking me back to square one.. I wish I could find a list of what not to add to specific distro's.. or a series package of programs that tests to determine if an add-on is compatible with the existing setup...

    In refurbishing 100's of old computers, the worst thing I found that people do to computers, is raise dust in cleaning the home while the computer is running.. The fans suck up a lot of that airborne dust, which overheats weakens and destroys computer components very fast.. Many computers were trashed just because of a loose wire connector in the tower.. Most computers trashed had their cooling systems totally plugged up with dust, or the op couldn't figure how to disable the bios PW, or didn't know that a few old bios default settings are incompatible with some newer Linux OS's...

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    25
    I've been running Linux for over 15 years, you name the Distro and yes I have installed it on one of my putrs. from Noppix, to UE, including Gentoo, and Debian........To date the best I have run LinuxMint, Debian Edition 64 bit., It's Ubuntu without the stupid Unity desktop.

    As for running everything..........not reccomended, for instance don't run a kde app in the gnome environment or vise versa.

    And I've also ran every Windoze flavor, My Preference is Linux.

    But whatever, even the worst Linux is better than the best Windoze.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    25
    Just the other day someone asked what KDE, Cinnimon, Mate etc. is, I told them it is simply a desktop environment.

    Maybe this URL can explain better than I can:

    http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2014/01/10...namon-or-mate/

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