A good(cheap) partitioner


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Thread: A good(cheap) partitioner

  1. #1
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    A good(cheap) partitioner

    Does anyone know of any good and cheap HDD partitioners so I can finally start using Linux on my computer instead of Windows XP. Also if the patitioner could wipe out my HDD that would be great. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    Any linux distribution you choose will come with some sort of disk partitioner.
    However, I recommend using the gparted live cd . First boot off this cd, partition your disk, then boot off the installation cd for your linux distribution.
    Check out the Unix/Linux Administration Program at Seneca College.
    Thanx to everyone that helped/helps me on this forum!

    t0mmyw on #linuxn00b

  3. #3
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    I have yet to find a Linux that does not have program "fdisk" which is probaly the grand dad of many other partitioning tools in Linux.

    I highly recommend the program "cfdisk" which, like fdisk, is another integral part of the terminal commands (Bash shell) that every Linux must have. However the Red Hat famialy uses "sfdisk" in place of "cfdisk".

    Using Gparted or QTparted or any other partitioning tools that runs only in a GUI is alright but they are not universally available in every distro whereas fdisk are present in 100% distros and cfdisk in possibly 80% of them.

    cfdisk has a text screen showing the partitions as you creating them. I recommend it because it will stop you from doing illegal things and tells you the reasons. This is particularly helpful if you are not familar with the hard disk partitioning convention in PC.

    Over 100 partition types are supported in Linux and cfdisk is one of the most versatile for altering the partition characteristics. It is also a great tool if you have ever a need to rebuild the partition table again.

    From my experience with PC systems there is no other partitioning tool more flexible and versatile than cfdisk and fdisk combined. I use them (cfdisk to partition and fdisk to confirm) to partition Dos, Windows (Win9x, Win2k, xp, Vista), Linux, BSD, Solaris and Darwin X86 and run 140+ partitions in my PC.

    In Linux the simplest can be the most powerful.

    Don't think a user needs to pay to get any of the Linux partitioning tools unless he/she doesn't want to do the downloading and order the software in the ready made CD.

    The terminal commands of cfdisk, sfdisk and fdisk do not do resizing of partitions. That job has to be done by GUI-based programs which may not be reliable on ntfs partitions when I tried them.
    Last edited by saikee; 12-24-2006 at 08:53 AM.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by saikee
    I have yet to find a Linux that does not have program "fdisk" which is probaly the grand dad of many other partitioning tools in Linux.

    I highly recommend the program "cfdisk" which, like fdisk, is another integral part of the terminal commands (Bash shell) that every Linux must have. However the Red Hat famialy uses "sfdisk" in place of "cfdisk".

    Using Gparted or QTparted or any other partitioning tools that runs only in a GUI is alright but they are not universally available in every distro whereas fdisk are present in 100% distros and cfdisk in possibly 80% of them.

    cfdisk has a text screen showing the partitions as you creating them. I recommend it because it will stop you from doing illegal things and tells you the reasons. This is particularly helpful if you are not familar with the hard disk partitioning convention in PC.

    Over 100 partition types are supported in Linux and cfdisk is one of the most versatile for altering the partition characteristics. It is also a great tool if you have ever a need to rebuild the partition table again.

    From my experience with PC systems there is no other partitioning tool more flexible and versatile than cfdisk and fdisk combined. I use them (cfdisk to partition and fdisk to confirm) to partition Dos, Windows (Win9x, Win2k, xp, Vista), Linux, BSD, Solaris and Darwin X86 and run 140+ partitions in my PC.

    In Linux the simplest can be the most powerful.

    Don't think a user needs to pay to get any of the Linux partitioning tools unless he/she doesn't want to do the downloading and order the software in the ready made CD.

    The terminal commands of cfdisk, sfdisk and fdisk do not do resizing of partitions. That job has to be done by GUI-based programs which may not be reliable on ntfs partitions when I tried them.
    Thanks to both of you.

    Now with the cfdisk command, once I partition the space on my HDD do I just download it from linux form the disk or do I have to do something else.

  5. #5
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    You can get any Linux, including Live CD, from the Internet. The best place is probably distrowatch.com.

    You basically download an iso file that match your pc. use i386/i486/i586 for 32 bit and x86_64 for 64 bit CPU.

    You then burn the iso image into a CD which is a special operation and different from just copying the file over.

    The Linux CD is then bootable and you will find cfdisk & fdisk inside 80% of the distros.

    To use cfdisk and fdisk may be regarded as system commands in many distros for which you will be demanded of a root password (Admin password in XP). Most Live CD allows you to log in as the root user in terminal by command "su" and waive the password requirement for the "superuser".

    If you use cfdisk or fdisk to create a partition it will be Type 83 by default recognised by every Linux for installation. For the first Linux you need an additional partition for Swap and that is Type 82. You need to instruct cfdisk to alter the type. It all becomes clear once you have a screen to look at.

    A 10 Gb should accommodate 99.99% of the Linux distos and I use 1Gb for the swap partition as it is easy to remember. You should be aware of a ntfs partition, which XP uses, has a Type No 7. Seeing it in the partition table is a guarantee that you are not losing it.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

  6. #6
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    One more quick question, do I need a cd to run a Live CD and if I do is there anyway to move it without a cd, my computer will not read disks right now for some reason and I could get it fixed but I would really like to use linux right now and worry about that when I have the money

  7. #7
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    A Live CD by its very definition "is" a CD. This is the standard means of getting a Linux as most of them are available in the form of an iso image.

    What you could do is to use another computer to download it and burn it into a bootable CD. You then install the Linux into a pen drive and use it in your own PC. Not all of the distros can do that but few small ones are rigged for such a purpose. One Linux that will suit this application is Puppy.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

  8. #8
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    but you are unable to resize HDD with fdisk. so you must turn to a partition resizer..... such as qparted.
    "Software is like sex: it's better when its free."
    -LINUS TORVALDS

  9. #9
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    There has been regular reports that Windows user getting into trouble of ending up with unbootable or corrupted systems by combining the "resizing of the hard disk" with "a Linux installation".

    As Linux reads but not writes ntfs partitions many Linux-based resizing programs are experimental, not universally reliable and can break down in the middle of the operation. This is a nightmare for a Windows user beginning his/her first step in Linux. Even with Windows-based software it is often necessary for the user to defrag the partition before the resizing exercise and to take other cautionary measures.

    I take the view that it is better for a Windows system to use its own software to resize the OS partition because the Windows-based resizing programs are mostly propietary software obligated to preserve the integrity of a Windows OS.

    Thus combining a Linux-based resizing exercise with an installation seems a bad idea to me anyway. When a problem developed a newbie would not be able to know if it originates from the "resizing" or the "installation" activity.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

  10. #10
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    Try http://www.partedmagic.com

    I just got the web site going yesterday. It's basiclly gparted livecd with all the problems fixed from 0.3.1-1 which was MY last release of the gparted livecd.

    Resiszing NTFS was dangerous in the past but it isn't now with the new ntfsprogs. If you have any problems with gparted consult the gparted forum.

    saikee I really respect your opinion, but most of what you have been saying about resizing NTFS is a bit dated. You would not believe how far the ntfsprog, parted, and gparted have come in the last year. Look into it, we have been really working hard on this stuff.
    Patrick Verner
    www.partedmagic.com

  11. #11
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    Exodus2001,

    I am just cautious. Been using new gparted CD in the last few days and will try out your Parted Magic.

    I don't doubt the Linux resizers ability. It is just the task of combing resizing a Windows partition and the installation of a Linux distro in one move that make it intractable for newcomer to Linux. Most of them can't even tell a logical partition from a primary partition but can risk (1) loss of a bootable Windows, (2) failed Linux installation and (3) damaged partition table making data recovery difficult.

    Anything Parted Magic can help to overcome or simplify the resizing/installtion task would be a big contribution to the Linux community.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

  12. #12
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    Hey Exodus, is there a reason why you created Parted Magic and didnt just continue work on the gparted live cd??
    Check out the Unix/Linux Administration Program at Seneca College.
    Thanx to everyone that helped/helps me on this forum!

    t0mmyw on #linuxn00b

  13. #13
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    Calipso

    GParted liveCD was a demo for GParted and the developer didn't want to add much of anything else. I'm free to add what ever I like now as long as it is about partitions. Plors also was not interested in making money with it at all. I would like to make at least a small amount to pay for my hobby. GParted LiveCD had 500,000 downloads in one year and only brought in about $600. I would also like to sell stuff like usb drives with the sofware all ready to go, google banners, etc... To make a long story sort, I was really restricted about what I did and when I did it. I put about 500-1000 hours in the project and walked away with some pats on the back and $100.

    Also, if another graphical partitioner comes out, I can add it to my CD.

    No hard feelings tword the GParted folks.
    Patrick Verner
    www.partedmagic.com

  14. #14
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    saikee

    Anything Parted Magic can help to overcome or simplify the resizing/installtion task would be a big contribution to the Linux community.

    If you can elaborate on exactly what might make it more simple, I'm all ears. I love feedback like this.
    Patrick Verner
    www.partedmagic.com

  15. #15
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    I'm free to add what ever I like now as long as it is about partitions.
    Aren't you allowed to still add gparted? Since gparted is GPL software, I would imagine you are allowed to use it in what ever project you want no matter what the original author says.
    Check out the Unix/Linux Administration Program at Seneca College.
    Thanx to everyone that helped/helps me on this forum!

    t0mmyw on #linuxn00b

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