Insert tip here <------


Page 1 of 22 1234511 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 318

Thread: Insert tip here <------

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,380

    Insert tip here <------

    if you want to go to command line fast -
    ctr+alt F5
    to go back to gui -
    ctr+alt F7

    have the command line finish what you type-
    (for example you have a command 'evolution')
    evolu (press tab)

    insert more here
    |
    |
    |
    \ /
    "SEARCH FIRST... ASK SECOND" -mdwatts-

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kelowna, British Columbia,Canada
    Posts
    68
    have the command line finish what you type- (for example you have a command 'evolution') evolu (press tab)
    The tab key matches only to the first *unique* filename, so if you hit the tab key and it does not autocomplete, hit it twice to get a list of all matching possiblities. For example:

    cp r<TAB> will only complete if you have one file starting with "r"

    cp r<TAB><TAB> will show all files starting with "r", like this:

    run rpm rutabega rpc resolv.conf

    Greg

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Baltimore
    Posts
    521
    there are generally 6 virtual console Ctrl-alt-F5 will get you to the fifth one.

    ctrl-alt-[1 through 6] (from X) or alt-[ 1 through 6 ] (from another console) or alt-left/right (also from another console)

    locate foo finds all files on your computer whos name contains foo. locate -r '[fF]oo' uses regex match to limit results (this one finds all foo or Foo).
    http://www.etria.com
    Debian based webhosting

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,380
    Originally posted by bskahan

    locate foo finds all files on your computer whos name contains foo. locate -r '[fF]oo' uses regex match to limit results (this one finds all foo or Foo).
    as root, type 'updatedb' for the command 'locate' to recognize new files and it's location
    "SEARCH FIRST... ASK SECOND" -mdwatts-

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    97
    'history' allows you to see all the commands you types into the console so far.

    'dmesg' lets you see alot of sometimes helpful info about your computer

    '|more' lets you go a page at a time, with 'f' being forward one whole page at a time.

    'xf86cfg' allows you to see a very simple and powerful graphical interface to help you in setting up TV-out, dual monitors, and how your screens are configured (left to right, right to left, top and bottom, etc).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,380
    using "| less" may also work when getting page to page output from the terminal

    in kde: ctrl+esc shows the processes going on, you may kill some if you want
    ps -A also works the same
    kill pid pid - process id
    also "top"


    put root to sleep:
    while compiling or doing other running tasks in root type "ctr+z" to let it sleep for awhile, type "fg" (foreground) to wake up root.
    "SEARCH FIRST... ASK SECOND" -mdwatts-

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Posts
    4,361
    Use grep to slim down those search results:

    ps -aux | grep cupsd (see if cupsd is running)

    rpm -qa | grep xbill (see if xbill is installed)

    locate *.xpm | grep gnome (find where the gnome graphics are installed)


    Disclaimer: There are probably flags to check some of these things automatically, but why learn 3 flags for 3 commands, when you can just use one easy command?

    Grep is your friend
    mrBen "Carpe Aptenodytes"

    Linux User #216794

    My blog page

    3rd year running - get yourself to LugRadio Live 7th-8th July 2007, Wolverhampton, UK. The premier FLOSS community event.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    14,947
    If you know you've typed in something long and tedious before (like, for example, wine --winver=win2000 -- radmin.exe -connect pc185 -through drawform.com), but it's been a while, so you don't want to hold down the up arrow (which will scroll back through previous commands) for a long time, just hit Ctrl-R, and type in something that's in the command (in this case, "radmin" should work well). Ctrl-R puts bash into reverse-string-match mode, where it will look backwards through the history for a string matching what you type, as you type it.

    Also, I always edit my ~/.bash_profile (or /etc/profile, whichever) to export HISTSIZE=10000 ; export HISTFILESIZE=50000

    The HISTSIZE variable tells bash to remember 10,000 lines before either throwing them away or writing them to the history file (~/.bash_history -- I don't know if it writes them, or dumps them). The HISTFILESIZE variable gives bash a limit on the number of lines in that history file. Once that number gets passed, the first lines are deleted to make room.

    The default for HISTSIZE is something like 100, and HISTFILESIZE is like 1000. Much too small for me, personally.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    8,130
    TIP: Search www.google.com/linux, read the NHFs, and search the forums before posting

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,380
    Originally posted by bwkaz
    If you know you've typed in something long and tedious before (like, for example, wine --winver=win2000 -- radmin.exe -connect pc185 -through drawform.com), but it's been a while, so you don't want to hold down the up arrow (which will scroll back through previous commands) for a long time, just hit Ctrl-R, and type in something that's in the command (in this case, "radmin" should work well). Ctrl-R puts bash into reverse-string-match mode, where it will look backwards through the history for a string matching what you type, as you type it.

    [/B]
    wow I didn't know that one, I'll experiment with it, Thanks
    "SEARCH FIRST... ASK SECOND" -mdwatts-

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    14,947
    There's also a forward-search keystroke you can use, but I don't remember what it is. I have to read the bash manpage (readline section) to figure it out whenever I need it...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    39,320
    Originally posted by Cybr099
    TIP: Search www.google.com/linux, read the NHFs, and search the forums before posting
    That's a good one. I would never have thought of that.
    SEARCH FIRST... ASK SECOND Read the JL 'Community Help Posting Guidelines' before posting in the forums.

    Precompiled Redhat NTFS Modules

    Linuxplanet Tutorials

    If Linux doesn't have the solution, you have the wrong problem. ... Please do not send me a PM asking for help...

    Please read the search suggestion thread in JL Ideas

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Philippines
    Posts
    1,380
    it isn't much:

    ctrl+F1 to F* - change to another virtual desktop
    "SEARCH FIRST... ASK SECOND" -mdwatts-

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    305
    forward-search for history is Control-S, but that and Control-R might only work for VISUAL=emacs.
    Registered Linux User # 291626

    Ubuntu 7.04 -+- kernel 2.6.20-16 -+- Thinkpad T60 w/ Intel Centrino Duo

    Anarchism is founded on the observation that since few men are wise enough to rule themselves, even fewer are wise enough to rule others.
    - Edward Abbey

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    SF Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    14,947
    But doesn't Ctrl-S suspend the current process?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •