C++ in Linux ... Hmm, what to think about ?


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Thread: C++ in Linux ... Hmm, what to think about ?

  1. #1
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    C++ in Linux ... Hmm, what to think about ?

    Hi guys!

    I am taking a C++ class and I would like to get up to speed with C++ in Linux.

    What IDE do you recommend, Anjuta or KDevelop?

    What kind of libraries/packages do I have to install in order for it to work?

    ..and if there's a lot to install, in what order do I have to install them?

    What's the difference between developing in Linux and Windows?

    endl;
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  2. #2
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    i've never programmed in a gui, but using vi and gcc works very well! if you get used to that you can create 'make' files easily, but you can probably do that with IDE's to, but i don't know about that one, can i get a vouch?

  3. #3
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    I liked anjuta, but I too use vi more than anything.

    -goon12

  4. #4
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    vim, gcc, gdb....and make maybe...it is an integrated developer environment.

  5. #5
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    vim, g++, gdb, gcov and make. All of these should already be on your computer so you don't have to install anything.

  6. #6
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    I've been using vim + g++ for my CS class for a couple months now... works great, its simple... we're still writing little stupid programs so an IDE is simply overkill (thinking of VC++).

  7. #7
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    Re: C++ in Linux ... Hmm, what to think about ?

    Originally posted by svarreby
    Hi guys!

    I am taking a C++ class and I would like to get up to speed with C++ in Linux.

    What IDE do you recommend, Anjuta or KDevelop?

    What kind of libraries/packages do I have to install in order for it to work?

    ..and if there's a lot to install, in what order do I have to install them?

    What's the difference between developing in Linux and Windows?

    endl;
    You don't need a sophisticated IDE unless you are write GUI applications, than the best IDE would be the IDE that supports the GUI library you want to use.

    Some C++ GUI libraries on Linux are QT, GTKmm, and wxWindows.

    QT is the easiest to install because it is on the Linux cd for most distributions, just install the package.

    Linux is different than MS Windows development because MS is a commercial product which pushes you in a specific direction and focuses on business solutions. On the other hand Linux is much better for research and learning how to develop systems. In other words on Linux you can be a generalist but on Microsoft you are forced to specialize through vendor libraries.

  8. #8
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    nobody mentioned it, but a great way to develop is using emacs which can completely integrated with gdb, cvs ... it is nearly an IDE, if you have to switch between different files emacs is better than vi.

    If you want to make gui applications there are (unfortunately ?!) various choices:
    - X programming (Xlib), not recommended unless you are writing a wm
    - Qt
    - GTK
    - FOX
    - wxWindows
    the last 4 are toolkits that stand above X and provide all functionalities you can find in, say MFC.
    FOX and wxWindows are portable, Qt has been ported to Winblows but it is not free.

    micio

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by micio
    ...if you have to switch between different files emacs is better than vi.
    Use 'screen', then.


    Erm... What's Glade like? Anyone tried it?
    "Heisenberg may have been here."

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by terribleRobbo
    Use 'screen', then.


    Erm... What's Glade like? Anyone tried it?
    Yeah,tried glade because I didn't had kde installed. Didn't passeed the phasee whereyou add somebuttons on your dialog. Silly me...
    I use eclipse + kate since i program mostly in Java , but when I try gcc and all those stuffs (in a very ignorant way , mind you) , I use kate. If in console mode then I use pico. I'm too lazy for vi or emacs
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  11. #11
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    :next and :prev in vim don't suit you, micio? There are commands to open different buffers in different splits, too, I just don't know what they are.

    Anyway, yeah, I use Glade a lot. The one thing that I don't like about it is the way it builds the build system if you tell it to -- the configure.in that it generates looks like it was supposed to be used for autoconf 2.1 or so. Not the autoconf 2.52 that I have installed.

    But that's not a big deal because once you build the build system, you can change it all you want and it shouldn't get overwritten. So I can run autoupdate and then hack the m4 scripts a bit more, and that seems to work fine.

    I've also used Qt Designer to create Qt GUIs, and the only problems with it were (1) the crappy look of Qt (IMVHO) compared to Gtk, and I don't want to start a flamewar over that, but I'm afraid it'll happen, so let me say this -- THAT'S JUST MY OPINION!, and (2) the fact that it doesn't use the autotools. Most people are used to the ./configure, make, make install sequence, but with Qt, it's "export QTDIR=/wherever && qmake *.pro && make && make install", but apparently a lot of people don't understand that for some reason. *shrug*

  12. #12
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    bwkaz you're right, those :next and rev (actually :wnext and :wprev!!) are not the best solution.
    Split is actually the only way I can manage multiple docs in vi (:split filename; CTRL-W to switch between documents without the need to save.
    Emacs, from this point of view is much better even if I don't like all those CTRL-X-Y: three thousand key presses to have one function ... much better the "beep" mode of vi.

    Then, gdb can be integrated with emacs, while you are debugging, emacs shows you the source code and the point of execution (just like ddd), this is great.

    terribleRobbo: what's screen?!?!

    About GUI programming: I have to admit that I haven't found yet the solution that fits me, I've tryed X (great but ...), Fox (not bad!), wxWindows, GTK .... at present the stable solution seems to be wxWindows because same code compiles on both Linux and Winblows.

    micio

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