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Thread: Printing from a windowsXP box to a Linux machine - "Access denied"

  1. #16
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    All I can say is that I had the same problem with my setup and adding the encrypted password line in smb.conf made it work.
    "I know where you're from but where do you belong?"

  2. #17
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    If you are using security = share, I wouldn't think that encrypt passwords = yes would be necessary since no password information is needed from the Windows machine. I could be wrong though.
    But, since file sharing works between deanrantala's Windows machines and Samba server, I don't think authentication should be the issue. Uncommenting that line in his smb.conf file sure wouldn't hurt anything and would eliminate that issue.

    I know in older versions of Samba, the default was encrypt passwords = no. In Samba 3, the default is encrypt passwords = yes. I'm not sure when the transition was made from a default of no to yes.
    If God hadn't meant for us to use GUI tools, there wouldn't have been a Xerox PARC.

  3. #18
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    damn.. This has about got me at the end of my nerves...


    Well, yes, I checked. I have cups support in my samba build. I went over the smb.conf file - I'll even post it to see if you can see anyhitng I have missed once again. Still no printing, of coarse - and no, there are no error messages (besides the usuall access denied) - the data just goes to .errrr.... data heaven.

    Also checked up about the fact I needed a guest account to print?? This is getting deep. Guest account - I will then need to set a password (slack will not make an account withoug password) wich means I will have to enable encrypted passwords, wich means I need to set additional permissions on the server, etc, etc...

    damn damn...

    Also tried the IPP way on XP - nothing. What exactly do I need extra in my cupsd.conf file? If I can get this working, it will suffice. And when I try to create a new port - I can NOT enter the URL in the "printer name or IP address" box - only the IP address. It gives me no option to enter the path to the printer. And if I enter anyhitng else besides an IP in the "port name" box, it is the same thing - I get an error saying it is an invaliv port name. I However, I CAN see the printer already listed in the "Use the following port" box as you say - with the full URL and printer name, so once again - WinXP sees the damn thing, but is too stupid to use it - only this time I actually get an error message that says the test page failed to print. Well, At least it is now telling me to take a hike - so I am getting somewhere now...lol.

    But I need to also figure out how to get this samba printing working as well.. They have been developing this now for years, it should not be this much of a headache to get working...

    I need a drink... I'll post back in a bit.

  4. #19
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    [global]

    # workgroup = NT-Domain-Name or Workgroup-Name, eg: LINUX2
    workgroup = WORKGROUP

    # server string is the equivalent of the NT Description field
    server string = File Server

    # This option is important for security. It allows you to restrict
    # connections to machines which are on your local network. The
    # following example restricts access to two C class networks and
    # the "loopback" interface. For more examples of the syntax see
    # the smb.conf man page
    ; hosts allow = 192.168.1. 192.168.2. 127.

    # If you want to automatically load your printer list rather
    # than setting them up individually then you'll need this
    load printers = yes

    # you may wish to override the location of the printcap file
    ; printcap name = /etc/printcap

    # on SystemV system setting printcap name to lpstat should allow
    # you to automatically obtain a printer list from the SystemV spool
    # system
    ; printcap name = lpstat

    # It should not be necessary to specify the print system type unless
    # it is non-standard. Currently supported print systems include:
    # bsd, sysv, plp, lprng, aix, hpux, qnx
    printing = cups
    printcap = cups
    printcap name = /etc/printcap
    # Uncomment this if you want a guest account, you must add this to /etc/passwd
    # otherwise the user "nobody" is used
    ; guest account = pcguest

    # this tells Samba to use a separate log file for each machine
    # that connects
    log file = /var/log/samba.%m

    # Put a capping on the size of the log files (in Kb).
    max log size = 50

    # Security mode. Most people will want user level security. See
    # security_level.txt for details. NOTE: To get the behaviour of
    # Samba-1.9.18, you'll need to use "security = share".
    security = share

    # Use password server option only with security = server
    # The argument list may include:
    # password server = My_PDC_Name [My_BDC_Name] [My_Next_BDC_Name]
    # or to auto-locate the domain controller/s
    # password server = *
    ; password server = <NT-Server-Name>

    # Note: Do NOT use the now deprecated option of "domain controller"
    # This option is no longer implemented.

    # You may wish to use password encryption. Please read
    # ENCRYPTION.txt, Win95.txt and WinNT.txt in the Samba documentation.
    # Do not enable this option unless you have read those documents
    encrypt passwords = yes

    # Where to find the SSL certificates:
    ssl CA certDir = /etc/ssl/certs

    # Using the following line enables you to customise your configuration
    # on a per machine basis. The %m gets replaced with the netbios name
    # of the machine that is connecting
    ; include = /usr/local/samba/lib/smb.conf.%m

    # Most people will find that this option gives better performance.
    # See speed.txt and the manual pages for details
    # You may want to add the following on a Linux system:
    SO_RCVBUF=8192 SO_SNDBUF=8192
    socket options = TCP_NODELAY

    # Configure Samba to use multiple interfaces
    # If you have multiple network interfaces then you must list them
    # here. See the man page for details.
    ; interfaces = 192.168.12.2/24 192.168.13.2/24

    # Browser Control Options:
    # set local master to no if you don't want Samba to become a master
    # browser on your network. Otherwise the normal election rules apply
    ; local master = no

    # OS Level determines the precedence of this server in master browser
    # elections. The default value should be reasonable
    ; os level = 33

    # Domain Master specifies Samba to be the Domain Master Browser. This
    # allows Samba to collate browse lists between subnets. Don't use this
    # if you already have a Windows NT domain controller doing this job
    # domain master = yes

    # Preferred Master causes Samba to force a local browser election on startup
    # and gives it a slightly higher chance of winning the election
    preferred master = yes

    # Enable this if you want Samba to be a domain logon server for
    # Windows95 workstations.
    ; domain logons = yes

    # if you enable domain logons then you may want a per-machine or
    # per user logon script
    # run a specific logon batch file per workstation (machine)
    ; logon script = %m.bat
    # run a specific logon batch file per username
    ; logon script = %U.bat

    # Where to store roving profiles (only for Win95 and WinNT)
    # %L substitutes for this servers netbios name, %U is username
    # You must uncomment the [Profiles] share below
    ; logon path = \\%L\Profiles\%U

    # Windows Internet Name Serving Support Section:
    # WINS Support - Tells the NMBD component of Samba to enable it's WINS Server
    ; wins support = yes

    # WINS Server - Tells the NMBD components of Samba to be a WINS Client
    # Note: Samba can be either a WINS Server, or a WINS Client, but NOT both
    ; wins server = w.x.y.z

    # WINS Proxy - Tells Samba to answer name resolution queries on
    # behalf of a non WINS capable client, for this to work there must be
    # at least one WINS Server on the network. The default is NO.
    ; wins proxy = yes

    # DNS Proxy - tells Samba whether or not to try to resolve NetBIOS names
    # via DNS nslookups. The built-in default for versions 1.9.17 is yes,
    # this has been changed in version 1.9.18 to no.
    dns proxy = no

    #============================ Share Definitions ==============================
    [homes]
    comment = Home Directories
    browseable = no
    writable = yes

    # Un-comment the following and create the netlogon directory for Domain Logons
    ; [netlogon]
    ; comment = Network Logon Service
    ; path = /usr/local/samba/lib/netlogon
    ; guest ok = yes
    ; writable = no
    ; share modes = no


    # Un-comment the following to provide a specific roving profile share
    # the default is to use the user's home directory
    ;[Profiles]
    ; path = /usr/local/samba/profiles
    ; browseable = no
    ; guest ok = yes


    # NOTE: If you have a BSD-style print system there is no need to
    # specifically define each individual printer
    [printers]
    comment = All Printers
    path = /var/spool/samba
    browseable = no
    printing = cups
    printcap = cups
    # Set public = yes to allow user 'guest account' to print
    guest ok = yes
    writable = yes
    public = yes
    printable = yes

    # This one is useful for people to share files
    ;[tmp]
    ; comment = Temporary file space
    ; path = /tmp
    ; read only = no
    ; public = yes

    # A publicly accessible directory, but read only, except for people in
    # the "staff" group
    ;[public]
    ; comment = Public Stuff
    ; path = /home/samba
    ; public = yes
    ; writable = yes
    ; printable = no
    ; write list = @staff

    # Other examples.
    #
    # A private printer, usable only by fred. Spool data will be placed in fred's
    # home directory. Note that fred must have write access to the spool directory,
    # wherever it is.
    ;[fredsprn]
    ; comment = Fred's Printer
    ; valid users = fred
    ; path = /homes/fred
    ; printer = freds_printer
    ; public = no
    ; writable = no
    ; printable = yes

    # A private directory, usable only by fred. Note that fred requires write
    # access to the directory.
    ;[fredsdir]
    ; comment = Fred's Service
    ; path = /usr/somewhere/private
    ; valid users = fred
    ; public = no
    ; writable = yes
    ; printable = no

    # a service which has a different directory for each machine that connects
    # this allows you to tailor configurations to incoming machines. You could
    # also use the %U option to tailor it by user name.
    # The %m gets replaced with the machine name that is connecting.
    ;[pchome]
    ; comment = PC Directories
    ; path = /usr/pc/%m
    ; public = no
    ; writable = yes

    # A publicly accessible directory, read/write to all users. Note that all files
    # created in the directory by users will be owned by the default user, so
    # any user with access can delete any other user's files. Obviously this
    # directory must be writable by the default user. Another user could of course
    # be specified, in which case all files would be owned by that user instead.
    ;[public]
    ; path = /usr/somewhere/else/public
    ; public = yes
    ; only guest = yes
    ; writable = yes
    ; printable = no

    # The following two entries demonstrate how to share a directory so that two
    # users can place files there that will be owned by the specific users. In this
    # setup, the directory should be writable by both users and should have the
    # sticky bit set on it to prevent abuse. Obviously this could be extended to
    # as many users as required.
    ;[myshare]
    ; comment = Mary's and Fred's stuff
    ; path = /usr/somewhere/shared
    ; valid users = mary fred
    ; public = no
    ; writable = yes
    ; printable = no
    ; create mask = 0765
    [shared]
    comment = Dean's shared folder
    path = /home/deano/Shared
    writable = yes
    public = yes

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
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    Cookeville, TN
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    there is my *current* smb.conf file. I have set everyting you all have told me so far. Please go over it and let me know what is wrong - if there IS anyhitng wrong....

    Yes, I can print from one Linux box to another via cups just fine. So it would tell that IPP is obviously working fine on the server end.

    I might need another drink.....


    thanks a million so far for all the help also, I really appreciate it.

  6. #21
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    Update...

    Got the printer added to the XP box via IPP - and it now says "ready" on the status.. but still can't print. In fact, I can't even open the printer properties dialog for it - it says "Printer properties cannot be displayed, opperation not permitted"

    *sigh*

    I am begining to think RH does somthing strange to the samba build - or even adds some proprietary software to the distro to print like you say it does because this seems to be a very common problem that is never solved (from looking at all the previous posts on the same thing)

    and like I said, even setting it up through SuSE and YaST, I get the same thing, if YaST can't do it it seems it is just not possible. Perhaps this is a bug? But like a said, I have tried it on multiple Distros and win boxes on various networks - every last one is the same issue. So the problem is common. And yet.. I can print from windows to windows, From Linux to Linux, but not across the two. And even yet - I can share files amongst all. this just defies logic it seems.

  7. #22
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    I wouldn't be too quick to give Red Hat any credit.

    I think one of the differences on my network may be that my printers are not connected directly to my Linux server. I have 2 printers, an HP LJ2200 and an HP DJ 890C. They are both connected to a D-Link print server.
    So, when I set them up in cups, the Queue type is Networked Unix(LPD), not Locally Connected.

    I thought maybe that was the difference so I attached one of my printers directly to the server for testing. Sure enough, I had the same problems you did. No matter what I did, I could not print to the printer, either as a shared cups printer or as a Samba printer. I did get as far as having the light flash on the printer like it was receiving the job but it never printed. It just hung up in the queue.

    If I looked in /var/log/cups/error_log I could see that the jobs had been handed to cups and it tried to print them but it never would. I'm not sure what the problem is.

    But, when the printers are attached to my print server, everything works OK. I set the printer driver as a raw print queue and I can print from my XP machines.

    When you read the Samba literature, Samba and cups should work together seamlessly. Somewhere there is a problem though. Maybe the answer may be on a Samba or cups mailing list.

    I think if it was me, I'd either spend $80 on a networked print server or change back to lprng printing on my Linux/Samba server. I've never seen any problems with that not working with Windows.
    If God hadn't meant for us to use GUI tools, there wouldn't have been a Xerox PARC.

  8. #23
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    Hrmm. well, it looks like that is what I might end up doing...

    Well, at least I feel better knowing I am not the only one who has the problem.... lol..

    Antways, Thanks for all the help - although we didn't get too far, we managed to establish that there is obviously a slight issue with cups/samba. I might look into it a little and if I do find a solution, I will probably post it in "how I did it" for everyone else who seems to have this common issue.

    Cheers

  9. #24
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    Portland, Oregon
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    Okay, I realize this topic is kinda dormant and all involved parties consider it solved. Meantime, I have been though dozens of Linux print sharing tutorials and discussions over the last year, am no closer to getting print sharing to work by using a Linux box serving a LAN running Win computers, and it finally occurred to me why:

    Nobody is explaining how to setup the Win computers. It's that simple.

    Awhile back someone walked me through setting up print sharing between two Win computers (which only half worked; anytime the remote computer was rebooted the print initialization had to be reinitialized).

    Meantime, I am running a home LAN on cable with two W2K computers hooked to an FC1 box setup exactly like This (I wrote that tutorial - any additional perpective there is welcome, since I may have misinterpreted a few things).

    So let's work backwards here. Say I have done everything suggested on this thread regarding configuring Samba, CUPS and whatnot. What settings need to be applied to the Win computers to make them talk to the Linux box?
    Llamasery - Enlightened Internet Strategies
    "Most isms are wasms." --Gerald Vision, philosophy professor

  10. #25
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    Calgary, Alberta, Canada
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    Dean.

    Lose SAMBA for printer sharing - you don't need it. Win XP can print directly to CUPS without SAMBA in the picture at all.... Snag me on #justlinux next time you are on and I'll help.

    1. make sure CUPS Daemon is set up to accept connections over the network

    2. Set up the printer in Windows: In the wizard, pick "Connect to a printer on the Internet or on a home office network", enter the URL for the printer. The URL on mine looks like this: http://homesrvlinux01.home.bluffs.ab.ca:631/printers/lp

    3. Tell it what driver to use, and print a test page

  11. #26
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    Originally posted by Hayl 1. make sure CUPS Daemon is set up to accept connections over the network
    Okay, so for sake of clarity say I Have an HP OfficeJet T45 connected to the FC1 box, and did this (from KDE):

    Start (or "Hat" ) > System Settings > Printing

    I have one printer listed as lp0, and it test prints fine. Now I select this printer and go to:

    Action > Sharing... > Queue > This queue available... (select) > All hosts (select) > General > Automatically find... > Save and exit

    Anything I missed there?

    Originally posted by Hayl 2. Set up the printer in Windows: In the wizard, pick "Connect to a printer on the Internet or on a home office network", enter the URL for the printer. The URL on mine looks like this: http://homesrvlinux01.home.bluffs.ab.ca:631/printers/lp
    This is where I run into trouble, probably becuase I don't know what url it's looking for. I had assumed since eth0 is assigned IP 192.168.1.1 I could just use that. No dice.

    Any perspective is appreciated.
    Llamasery - Enlightened Internet Strategies
    "Most isms are wasms." --Gerald Vision, philosophy professor

  12. #27
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    Progress by inches. From your example I used:

    http://192.168.1.1:631/printers/lp0
    (I would appreciate knowing exactly what that ':631' part is doing)

    ...and now get this message:

    The server on which the 'HP OfficeJet T45 Foomatic/hpijs (recommended)' printer resides does not have the correct printer driver installed. If you want to install the driver on your local computer, click ok.
    Obviously I don't want to install the driver locally (the printer is already working fine on the FC1 box), so what now?
    Llamasery - Enlightened Internet Strategies
    "Most isms are wasms." --Gerald Vision, philosophy professor

  13. #28
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    Originally posted by welo
    Progress by inches. From your example I used:

    http://192.168.1.1:631/printers/lp0
    (I would appreciate knowing exactly what that ':631' part is doing)

    ...and now get this message:



    Obviously I don't want to install the driver locally (the printer is already working fine on the FC1 box), so what now?
    ya you do... that is a window message to install the driver locally. you have to have the driver installed locally or windows can't spool the data. you can't not have the driver installed locally if you do it this way. trust me - install the driver and it will work. windows is just whining that the server doesn't have a copy of the driver for it to downlaod and install.

    the :631 is the port - CUPS uses port 631

  14. #29
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    Okay, when you put it like that it makes sense. The reason I didn't want to install the HP drivers on my W2K machine(s) is because they come in a 30Mb exe file containing all kinds of extraneous crap for fax and image management etc. It takes a 2.66Ghz computer one minute to load them on boot, and it's just a flat out dodgy, buggy setup. However, I did manage to find just the the .inf files for the printer and scanner. Lemme see if I can figure out how to install them without having to lug this printer around and connect it to the various machines.
    Llamasery - Enlightened Internet Strategies
    "Most isms are wasms." --Gerald Vision, philosophy professor

  15. #30
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    cool - ya there has to be a way to select the driver - only

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