Freebsd and /home???


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Thread: Freebsd and /home???

  1. #1
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    Freebsd and /home???

    Alright, I've decided that it's time for a change, and am looking for something new for an OS. (Ok, I get restless and embark on new things.)

    Anyway, I was looking over the documentation for freebsd, and didn't see any reference to /home in the partitioning schemes.

    Is /home used for user files? If not, then where are they stored?

    I like having a separate partition for my personal files. I've had many a time when that has saved my work when I've had to reinstall the OS (brother-in-law simply unplugged my computer one time to move it rather than powering it off -- result was a completly unbootable system).

    TIA
    Knute

    You live, you die, enjoy the interval!

  2. #2
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    /home is a sim-link to /usr/home

    /home -> /usr/home

  3. #3
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    So then if I'm considering switching from linux to freebsd, all I'd need to do is mount the current /home partition in /usr/home and all is well?

    (assuming compatible partitions that is)

    I'm currently useing reiserfs on /home, which, if I read right would cause some problems.
    Knute

    You live, you die, enjoy the interval!

  4. #4
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    yeah, you're pretty much hosed mounting reiser from fbsd
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  5. #5
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    Usually, you have to explicitly make a /home partition. That is where user files are stored, but for some reason, FreeBSD doesn't suggest one during the install. This can be rather irritating, because the / partition is usually very small, like 256MB. This can cause a problem once even a single user decides to actually start saving stuff.
    Registered Linux user #230403! Since March 2001! YAY.

    Try doing a forum search or a google search before asking a question. And please don't use HELP! in the topic of your post... it's so lame... Please don't PM me for help-- post a question in the forum instead.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Cavnar, aka alc6379
    Usually, you have to explicitly make a /home partition. That is where user files are stored, but for some reason, FreeBSD doesn't suggest one during the install. This can be rather irritating, because the / partition is usually very small, like 256MB. This can cause a problem once even a single user decides to actually start saving stuff.
    That is actually not a problem, as (at least using the default partitioning scheme) the largest partition is /usr, which as was mentioned before, is where /home is on a FreeBSD system (there is a /home, but it is a symlink to /usr/home). A user named 'tom' has his home directory at /usr/home/tom.
    Last edited by demetrius; 02-10-2006 at 05:34 PM.
    Che cosa lo stucciacatori di polli?

  7. #7
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    umm just dont use autopartition when you install, set up the partitions however you want

    if its a desktop then a single / partition and a swap partition should be just fine
    you might want to make sure you hit the s key when you create your root partition to enable softupdates for UFS

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