which distro for gettng a job ?


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Thread: which distro for gettng a job ?

  1. #1
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    Question which distro for gettng a job ?

    i am learning C++ and want to get a job as "C++ & OOAD expert on Linux" platform. which distro i should use ?

    i am not a newbie. i am using Linux from last 1 year, hence quite comfortable with C-M-F3. i don't use Desktops, i am happy with a Window Manager. i am also looking for these features in my distro:

    1.) text based configuration system (i literally hate "sysconfig")
    2.) a good package manager that can handle dependencies
    3.) stable and reliable
    Last edited by geek.arnuld; 06-10-2007 at 11:27 AM.

  2. #2
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    I don't really know about text-based configuring, but I'm guessing it probably doesn't matter what distro you use for C++.

    If I were you, I'd use whatever I want, and reserve a partiton to gain some familiarity with popular enterprise distros that I could honesty claim on my resume. SUSE, CENTOS (free rhel) etc.

    I speak not as someone who knows anything about C++, only as a person who has tried a lot of distros... The particulars or each distro probably aren't going to matter for programming languages. If you know the Unix/Linux guts of the system, you ought to be able to easily pick up any distro that an employer might require of you.

    However, familiarizing yourself with some of them in advance would probably look better on your resume than not. SUSE, RedHat (Fedora, Centos) and Debian (Ubuntu, Mepis) would probably give you excellent coverage.

    Hopefully, someone who really knows what they're talking about should come along soon.

    P.S. Here's a couple of suggestions:

    Try a google search for linux text configuration

    Wikipedia has a great chart (or is a table) for comparing distros. Under Linux, I'm guessing. It's been a while.
    Last edited by blackbelt_jones; 06-10-2007 at 12:03 PM.

  3. #3
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    1.) text based configuration system (i literally hate "sysconfig")
    2.) a good package manager that can handle dependencies
    3.) stable and reliable
    gentoo , or debian are my favorites for linux

    and freeBSD and solaris for *NIX baed os
    "Software is like sex: it's better when its free."
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  4. #4
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    gentoo or debian...both have great package managers, though gentoo compiles from source and debian installs binaries. debian has more distro-specific stuff in it that won't really help you on the job, unless they're running debian...
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  5. #5
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    more votes for Gentoo and Debian. They are great for learning all the gritty of Linux...but also might want to learn some SUSE and/or Red Hat as a lot of businesses tend to favor them for their support features(services)

  6. #6
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    Well, CentOS is a redhat clone you can get for free, but I'm not betting on the long term strategy SuSE has recently adopted
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  7. #7
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    IF you are talking about securing an enterprise job where Linux is used on servers, then in the US, Red Hat is a clear winner. SUSE is a second place finish, and Mandrake/Mandriva is a distant third. Outside of the US, SUSE fares better, particularly in Germany and several regions in Europe. Novell's ownership of SUSE has helped in the US, and the recent deal with Microsoft, in spite of free software complainers, may help SUSE grab some accounts where Novell and Microsoft are already present.

    Ubuntu has great mindshare among desktop users. I have yet to see it in business, but that isn't to say it won't emerge. If Ubuntu continues along their current path, they are quite likely to make it and possibly displace one or more of the others. I could see them knocking off Mandriva - they are already toying with backrupcy for the second time.

    What do I like? I am a Debian kind of a guy. Given my own preferences, I would use a variation of Debian for everything. Xandros Server would be a nice option for small to medium sized businesses, and Xandros Desktop makes a great crossover product for those coming from Windows to Linux. I use SimplyMEPIS at home a lot and I am using it now.
    Brian W. Masinick
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  8. #8
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    Although most people would prefer a Debian or Gentoo solution, most corporations that run GNU/Linux use Redhat Enterprise or SuSE.

  9. #9
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    Yes, you said it clearer and in fewer words!

    Quote Originally Posted by E1PHOTON
    Although most people would prefer a Debian or Gentoo solution, most corporations that run GNU/Linux use Redhat Enterprise or SuSE.
    That was what I was getting at, yes. In financial institutions, for example, I don't know that anyone even LOOKS at anything other than Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Our company recently certified RHEL 4, for example.

    Companies tend to run stuff WAY behind the latest and greatest. They need a really long term, stable and secure support model. Ubuntu recently adding the notion of LTS - Long Term Support - was BIG for Debian derived systems.
    Brian W. Masinick
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  10. #10
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    master REDHAT its what companys use as well as SCO UNIX , AIX , FREEBSD , and HP-UX .......


    gentoo portage is a rip off of freeBSD port package.....

    one reason i like gentoo for linux.(have power of linux kernel ) ... and feeBSD for *NIX .
    "Software is like sex: it's better when its free."
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  11. #11
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    DEbain and Gentoo are great. Debian is great on old machines where you dont want to wait for compile time . Gentoo i tend to use on faster machines becuase compiling kde can be a ***** on on hardware up to 4 days on old machines....
    "Software is like sex: it's better when its free."
    -LINUS TORVALDS

  12. #12
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    ok .. i have decided with RHEL. i have used Fedora fro 6 months as it was my 1st GNU distro so i know some ins-&-outs of the system well :-)

    now, since i can not buy high-priced RHEL i will go with one of these: CentOS or Scientific Linux ...

    right choice?

  13. #13
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    CentOS is literally RHEL minus the logos and support. I deal with medium to (very) large financial institutions and almost all of them that run Linux at all run RHEL or CentOS. SuSE pops up from time to time, but if you know CentOS, you can find your way around SuSE with a little effort...

    A couple of notable exceptions: for now, the hardware platform my company sells to these institutions runs on SuSE 9.3, and the FAA runs a bunch of Ubuntu servers...not sure what they do with them, however...
    Slackware current (Dell Latitude D610)
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  14. #14
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    Interesting to see a few variations out there

    Quote Originally Posted by psych-major
    CentOS is literally RHEL minus the logos and support. I deal with medium to (very) large financial institutions and almost all of them that run Linux at all run RHEL or CentOS. SuSE pops up from time to time, but if you know CentOS, you can find your way around SuSE with a little effort...

    A couple of notable exceptions: for now, the hardware platform my company sells to these institutions runs on SuSE 9.3, and the FAA runs a bunch of Ubuntu servers...not sure what they do with them, however...
    Obviously each of the surviving commercial Linux companies must have SOME business, but it is good to see that some of us can actually see more than one vendor out there selling stuff.

    I did not know that some financial institutions ran CentOS rather than RHEL. Are they smaller institutions, or are they among the bigger ones? I know that Reuters financial software for market data used to run on Sun Solaris but now can also run on Red Hat Enterprise Linux, so it does not surprise me that someone COULD run that kind of stuff on other platforms, but I personally had not heard of any real cases where that was taking place. Where I happen to work, the company is more interested in getting solid support that they can call on, most certainly twenty four hours a day, but any time and conceivably anywhere as well. That leaves out most of the smaller companies, effectively leaving only Red Hat, Novell, and conceivably hardware companies to pick up hardware (and software) support.
    Brian W. Masinick
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  15. #15
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    Once again, it probably doesn't matter. You could use Debian at home and pick up RHEL very quickly in a work environment, but since you may be competing with someone who knows Red Hat, it wouldn't hurt to be able to put it on your resume. Centos is close enough to Red Hat that you could put Red Hat on your resume without lying.

    So, yeah CentOS is a good choice.

    Actually, Fedora might be better if you want easy access to home entertainment stuff. It comes more fully loaded, and it always seemed to me like part of the idea behind Fedora was to prepare home users to run RHEL.

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