How do you skip the partition section and just install HERE?


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Thread: How do you skip the partition section and just install HERE?

  1. #1
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    How do you skip the partition section and just install "HERE"?

    Like the title says...

    My HD is partitioned the way I want it and I want to install the distro "Here" but the installer won't let me, regardless whatever I click, and forces you to RE-partition what you ALREADY have setup there by destroying everything you have done... WTF???
    Last edited by noidly1; 12-12-2014 at 04:42 PM.

  2. #2
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    Do you know a partition when created is blank but has a partition type number?

    For Windows using NTFS filing system it is type 7 whereas for Linux it is Type 83 suitable for various filing system.

    If you have created a partition Type 7 Linux cannot be installed inside because its installer think you may have a reason for it. Linux is therefore pretty safe as it does not reside in a partition not belonging to itself.

    You can, as in Windows, delete the existing partitions, and re-create a set for Linux using a Linux installer or a Live CD.

    Linux supports over 100 partition types whereas Windows support no more than half a dozen. Below are the partition types used in a PC.

    Code:
      0  Empty           24  NEC DOS         81  Minix / old Lin bf  Solaris        
     1  FAT12           27  Hidden NTFS Win 82  Linux swap / So c1  DRDOS/sec (FAT-
     2  XENIX root      39  Plan 9          83  Linux           c4  DRDOS/sec (FAT-
     3  XENIX usr       3c  PartitionMagic  84  OS/2 hidden C:  c6  DRDOS/sec (FAT-
     4  FAT16 <32M      40  Venix 80286     85  Linux extended  c7  Syrinx         
     5  Extended        41  PPC PReP Boot   86  NTFS volume set da  Non-FS data    
     6  FAT16           42  SFS             87  NTFS volume set db  CP/M / CTOS / .
     7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT 4d  QNX4.x          88  Linux plaintext de  Dell Utility   
     8  AIX             4e  QNX4.x 2nd part 8e  Linux LVM       df  BootIt         
     9  AIX bootable    4f  QNX4.x 3rd part 93  Amoeba          e1  DOS access     
     a  OS/2 Boot Manag 50  OnTrack DM      94  Amoeba BBT      e3  DOS R/O        
     b  W95 FAT32       51  OnTrack DM6 Aux 9f  BSD/OS          e4  SpeedStor      
     c  W95 FAT32 (LBA) 52  CP/M            a0  IBM Thinkpad hi eb  BeOS fs        
     e  W95 FAT16 (LBA) 53  OnTrack DM6 Aux a5  FreeBSD         ee  GPT            
     f  W95 Ext'd (LBA) 54  OnTrackDM6      a6  OpenBSD         ef  EFI (FAT-12/16/
    10  OPUS            55  EZ-Drive        a7  NeXTSTEP        f0  Linux/PA-RISC b
    11  Hidden FAT12    56  Golden Bow      a8  Darwin UFS      f1  SpeedStor      
    12  Compaq diagnost 5c  Priam Edisk     a9  NetBSD          f4  SpeedStor      
    14  Hidden FAT16 <3 61  SpeedStor       ab  Darwin boot     f2  DOS secondary  
    16  Hidden FAT16    63  GNU HURD or Sys af  HFS / HFS+      fb  VMware VMFS    
    17  Hidden HPFS/NTF 64  Novell Netware  b7  BSDI fs         fc  VMware VMKCORE 
    18  AST SmartSleep  65  Novell Netware  b8  BSDI swap       fd  Linux RAID auto
    1b  Hidden W95 FAT3 70  DiskSecure Mult bb  Boot Wizard hid fe  LANstep        
    1c  Hidden W95 FAT3 75  PC/IX           be  Solaris boot    ff  BBT            
    1e  Hidden W95 FAT1 80  Old Minix
    The trick to install multi OS on a PC is to have a partition that is native to the OS and you will find its installer would sink its teeth into it would not let go.
    Last edited by saikee; 12-12-2014 at 05:30 PM.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

  3. #3
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    The partitions were formatted in ext3. The distro refused to use them.
    The installer said "do not use" which baffels me cause it is a known linux file format.
    Last edited by noidly1; 12-13-2014 at 01:36 AM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by noidly1 View Post
    The partitions were formatted in ext3. The distro refused to use them.
    The installer said "do not use" which baffels me cause it is a known linux file format.
    Well I have never seen a Linux installer refuses to use a partition specified by me.

    For a new installation there is no need to format the partition because it is far neater to allow the installer to carry out this task. Except small distros, like Puppy that actually asks the partition preformatted, most installers do not trust the users making the right procedure.

    In any case a user can ask an existing formatted partition to be used for installation in Linux but this can be risky. SUch arrangement can confuse the installer on the new files having the same filenames/parameters in the existing folders in designated locations. It will be difficult for an installer to make the correct decisions to overwrite some and/or keep the others. What is the purpose of a user wanting to keep the existing information? Thus a "dirty" install should be avoided whenever possible or don't blame the installer if it doesn't work.

    A standard sequence in a distro like the Ubuntu family is just

    Tell the installer that the user will select own arragement and not the default mrthods
    Hightlight the partition to be used for the installation
    Click to have it formatted
    select the filing system desired
    and go to make tea as the installation should be ready when return

    If you put an OS in a partition the intention is to let it reside there exclusively. So if you have formatted the partition before you can let the installer to format it again without any consequence. It only takes a few seconds. A "clean" install is also an error-free install, say for 98% in my experience.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

  5. #5
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    Idk. must be a debian thang.

    I started out with a blank sheet.

    1st primary partition, from 513kb to 24mb to cylinder,(23.5mb) fat16, for a data part to put a copy of grub to play with.

    2nd primary partition 8gb ext3 for debian.

    3rd primary partition 2gb swap for debian.

    4th primary partition 8gb fat32 for xp.

    Go figure...

  6. #6
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    The curiosity got hold of me so I download Debian 7.7.0 i387 DVD1.

    The installtion took 20 minutes and I am using Debian's Iceweasel to answer this thread.

    I select Graphic install from the installer first menu.

    Thereafter I was asked to select the lanugage, location and keyboard which is UK for me in all cases.

    The installer then went ahead to detect the hard disks & hardware, returning to claim one of my hardware has no driver. I just ignored it and got the network configured successfully with eth1.

    I was then invited to set up the Root password, create an ordinary user accout and its password. Pretty standard for every Linux.

    When it came to installing into the hard disk there were 4 choices

    (1) Use the entire hard disk (No OS worth the entire hard disk)
    (2) Use entire hard disk with LVM (not for me)
    (3) Use entire hard disk with encrypted LVM (my work doesn't need such security)
    (4) Manually (This is the one I selected always)

    I have sda1 to sda3 as primary, sda5 is a wap and two spare sda6 & sda7. At start I have only Mint17 installed in sda1 using swap sda5. Sda5 has 1G while all the others has 100G space in my 500Gb SSD.

    To install Debian I highlighted sda2, click this partition and selected Ext4 for its formatting.

    As usual the user needs to select how this partition will be mouted for. I select / which is the root filing system. This is the simplest. I then select "Finish Partitioning & write changes to disk".

    As usual the installer asked one more time for confirmation as once confirmed the installation would begin.

    20 minutes later I had Debian installed. Its Grub took over the MBA of sda and boot both my Mint and the new Debain.

    The root terminal output of "fdisk -l" show my hdd layout as
    Code:
    root@debian770:/home/saikee# fdisk -l
    
    WARNING: GPT (GUID Partition Table) detected on '/dev/sdb'! The util fdisk doesn't support GPT. Use GNU Parted.
    
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 4000.8 GB, 4000787030016 bytes
    256 heads, 63 sectors/track, 484501 cylinders, total 7814037168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1  4294967295  2147483647+  ee  GPT
    Partition 1 does not start on physical sector boundary.
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 512.1 GB, 512110190592 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 62260 cylinders, total 1000215216 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x000cf5ea
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *        2048   200000000    99998976+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda2       200000001   400000001   100000000+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda3       400000002   600000002   100000000+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda4       600002049  1000215215   200106583+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5       600002051   600022051       10000+  82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda6       600024100   800024100   100000000+  83  Linux
    /dev/sda7       800026149  1000215215   100094533+  83  Linux
    root@debian770:/home/saikee#
    The mount filing systems can be seen by command "df"
    Code:
    root@debian770:/home/saikee# df
    Filesystem                                             1K-blocks    Used Available Use% Mounted on
    rootfs                                                  98430852 3629928  89800924   4% /
    udev                                                       10240       0     10240   0% /dev
    tmpfs                                                    1246972     792   1246180   1% /run
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/c6abef32-3d1f-4a29-9fb2-c77463a40796  98430852 3629928  89800924   4% /
    tmpfs                                                       5120       0      5120   0% /run/lock
    tmpfs                                                    2495920     148   2495772   1% /run/shm
    The command "ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid" shows my sda2 has been mount as the root (/)
    Code:
    root@debian770:/home/saikee# ls -l /dev/disk/by-uuid/
    total 0
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Dec 14 16:48 004fb241-630b-41c6-8dfe-fb2796a9290b -> ../../sda1
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Dec 14 16:48 9EA29813A297EE51 -> ../../sdb2
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Dec 14 16:48 c6abef32-3d1f-4a29-9fb2-c77463a40796 -> ../../sda2
    lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Dec 14 16:48 d831db24-ac85-46f7-85f8-6397a67201ea -> ../../sda5
    Everything works as expected.

    It has always been the God given right for every user to be able to tell a Linux installer which partition to be used for installation.
    Last edited by saikee; 12-16-2014 at 09:29 PM.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

  7. #7
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    Ok. I didn't realize there were choices for the choices on the partition pages until I just started clicking on everything.
    I just thought there were only "those" choices, not that the choices had their own choices. Got it now. Debian installed fine.
    Only thing is I don't see a choice were to put the swap partition, which I'll discuss later...

    New problem, I used PowerQuest PartitionMagic to create the partitions. Good so far. I used Gparted Live to confirm everything, All ok.
    Once I had Debian installed on the partition I wanted it, it automatically used the swap partition, a primary, I had created for it.(on the same drive) COOL...

    Just to be sure all was well, I rebooted with PartitionMagic to check things out. It is giving me a Partition Table Error #114 (bad drive).
    That scared me so I rebooted with Gparted Live and it shows all is well. Hmm...

    So, If PartitionMagic shows the drive as bad, then that drive will not be visible to other Win OS's on other drives, which is not good.

    I have to get that part figured out before I can go any further with my build.

    Working with DOS and Win is not a problem for me but Linux is whole nother animal...
    If I can get Linux figured out with the install so it doesn't corrupt the drive so DOS or Win can see it, all would be Grand...

    Just curious, do you think having Grub installed is the cause of the partition ERROR???

    Thanks.

  8. #8
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    Partition Magic is known as Partition Tragic by many non-WIndows users.

    This software has no ability to handle Linux partitions so it always reports error and attempt to something it has no knowledge of.

    Do not trust this software and never do things it offers because it damages/destroys the hard disk partitions if take up its advice. Partition Magic is a Windows software so it has no intelligence how other OSes use the hard disks. For years I had Linux doing 64 partitions in one hard disk but this software thought it is an error because it has never seem anything like it.

    When it comes to partitioning Linux is miles ahead. If youi have trouble with a hard disk it will be eventually rejected by the operating system. Up to a point Linux can still read your hard disk and savage your data when Winodws have long given up.

    It is not a good idea to use two different partitioning tools from different operating systems. This is because Windows by default creates partition in units of MB while Linux now defaults to sectors. At one time Linux used cylinder as partition unit and in general allow the user to specify the partition in a variety of units. It is therefore possible that one operating system may complain the partition boundary, created by another OS, have empty space. This does not affect the computer working but may give stupid software like Partition Tragic an excuse to do something it does not understand.
    Last edited by saikee; 12-16-2014 at 09:21 PM.
    Linux user started Jun 2004 - No. 361921
    Using a Linux live CD to clone XP
    To install Linux and keep Windows MBR untouched
    Adding extra Linux & Doing it in a lazy way
    A Grub menu booting 100+ systems & A "Howto" to install and boot 145 systems
    Just cloning tips Just booting tips A collection of booting tips

    Judge asked Linux "You are being charged murdering Windoze by stabbing its heart with a weapon, what was it?" Replied Linux "A Live CD"

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